On having good taste

What makes it hard to get, & keep when you have it.<div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url='http://dappered.com/2014/05/on-having-good-taste/' addthis:title='On having good taste ' ><a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a><a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a><a class="addthis_button_email"></a><a class="addthis_button_pinterest_share"></a><a class="addthis_button_compact"></a><a class="addthis_counter addthis_bubble_style"></a></div>

The problem with having “good” taste, is that it’s awfully hard to acquire (and keep) if you loudly and categorically deny the preferences of others with no prompting when it comes to highly relative subjects.

“That outfit is ugly. Pure and simple.”
“That song is an absolute travesty”
“I don’t like this type of shoe at all.”

Okay. That’s nice.

You acquire good taste. You acquire it by allowing yourself to be exposed to variety. That doesn’t mean you have to like everything. Far from it. You can be picky as hell, and nothing is beloved by everyone. But those who take pleasure in constantly voicing their displeasure, without accounting for the fact that style (whether in clothes, or music, or food) is highly relative & full of minutiae… they narrow their own window of possibility.

These types who are sure that their displeasure is either universal, or warrants the expression of such, might want to ask themselves two questions before issuing a rejection or denial of something extremely relative:

1. “Do I have a concrete reason as to why I don’t like something?”
2. “Is there external value to the expression of my opinion? Does anyone care what I think?” 

If the answer is “no” to either, it’s probably better to sit back and observe.

That’s how we all get better. Or at least, not worse.